October Pieces Of My Mind #2

hedvig
The church of Hedvig Eleonora (1737), named not for a saint but for a royal. The project started when Queen Hedvig was 33 but wasn’t finished until 22 years after her death.
  • Reminding everyone: Google Translate’s smart phone app can scan and OCR convert pretty much any kind of text. You never have to type text from a book or archive document again.
  • Facebook thinks I should like a page from a rural school for grownups called “Healing writing”. And I am oh so very grateful that I am not one of those who have to read these writings.
  • I was kicked out of the prostate study. My test results were too healthy.
  • On his way home from Turkey in 1714, Carolus XII stayed in Șimleu Silvaniei / Szilágysomlyó. This is a magical name for Migration Period scholars because of a great gold hoard with Scandy connections.
  • The battery in my electric toothbrush has worn out. Replacing it involved soldering, for which I lack skills and gear. So I bought a new toothbrush. And refused to bring another charger home, leaving it in the store.
  • Etymological problem upon reading Leiber. Is it Lankh-mar and Ilth-mar? Or is it Lank-hmar and Ilt-hmar? Not many local speakers you could ask.
  • In his autobiography, Karl Bartos of Kraftwerk writes the opening chord of “A Hard Day’s Night” as “Bäng!”.
  • Adam van Düren, the architect behind Glimmingehus, knew runes and carved his motto with them in Lund Cathedral.
  • The German version of the genealogy web site MyHeritage is named MeinHerritage.
  • The worst thing about biting a cusp off a molar isn’t that you have a messed up tooth. It’s that the sharp edges cut into your tongue all the time.
  • Facebook’s algorithms just suggested that I might want to buy a tee-shirt with a drawing of Velma from Scooby Doo in the nude with enormous floppy galumphing breasts. I just can’t tell if Zuckerberg knows me not at all or too well.
  • Interesting ambivalent development among Chinese Swedes: 30-40 year old Chinese restaurants are closing down. Because the young folks now have university degrees and better jobs. As intended by their parents.
  • Want to get massively, royally baked? Visit Venus!
  • Hey recently middle-aged peeps: don’t buy expensive plastic-framed reading glasses and expect them to hold together, like I did twice. Buy dirt cheap metal-framed ones in family packs.

Author: Martin R

Dr. Martin Rundkvist is a Swedish archaeologist, journal editor, skeptic, atheist, lefty liberal, bookworm, boardgamer, geocacher and father of two.

9 thoughts on “October Pieces Of My Mind #2”

  1. Re toothbrush battery, if it is the induction charging type I’m familiar with, the real challenge is not the two little soldering points but re-sealing the package in an aesthetic and watertight way.
    Re Lankhmar, my money is on Lankh-mar with the letter aitch representing a puff of aspiration. But there really is no telling with a made-up language and unknown spelling conventions. Apparently, Leiber also used “Lankmar” or “Lahkmar” in early writings
    Re A Hard Day’s Night, that bang (Bäng) is a powerful thang and highly recognisable. The Beatles of course loved to use little gimmicks like this, e.g. the buzzing note that starts “I Feel Fine” which took hours to get right. On an almost unrelated note, I really like the Swedish name Bengt which means Benedict but sounds much like “peng” (bang) in German. Would do well for a large dog or an unruly child.

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  2. ‘In his autobiography, Karl Bartos of Kraftwerk writes the opening chord of “A Hard Day’s Night” as “Bäng!”.’ No one still alive who was involved with the Beatles’ recording remembers exactly how that chord was played and on which instruments. So Bartos is not just pissing people around – no one knows how to write it.

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  3. Actual Chinese restaurants are getting difficult to find in the American countryside as well, and for similar reasons. The trend in my area is to attempt to cover both Chinese and Japanese cuisine, and most such restaurants do neither one well.

    At least we are seeing more south and southeast Asian cuisines (Thai, Indian, Vietnamese) around here. I don’t know if that is true of Sweden.

    I actually ate in a Chinese restaurant in Stockholm about 20 years ago. I have no memory of the place, other than it was in the city center area north of Gamla Stan (which was the part of the city where I stayed on that trip). I found it comparable to most American Chinese restaurants, in that the offerings were tailored for local (i.e., Swedish) tastes. Let’s just say there is a reason why the Muppets’ Swedish Chef is Swedish.

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  4. “Facebook’s algorithms just suggested that I might want to buy a tee-shirt with a drawing of Velma from Scooby Doo in the nude with enormous floppy galumphing breasts. I just can’t tell if Zuckerberg knows me not at all or too well.”

    Note that Shaggy’s name is related to the Swedish word for beard.

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