February Pieces Of My Mind #2

borgboecker
I got my translation into Swedish of my seventh book from the printers!
  • I keep seeing people write “monolithic” when they mean “homogeneous” or “unanimous”. Do they even know what a monolith is?
  • Cousin E has been accepted to study maths at three English universities. I believe he’s headed for Imperial College London. Meanwhile, Junior is studying Japanese in Tokyo.
  • Soy beans are oblong but become spherical when dried.
  • Guess what baton czekoladowy means.
  • The expression “Bugger all” is truly cosmic in its scope. And graphic.
  • I’ve got so many fun archaeological projects at various scales going that I can’t keep them all in my head!
  • Yay! After all these years as a backer I finally got mentioned on the H.P. Lovecraft Literary Podcast!
  • I just found a 16th century ancestor named Boy von der Wettering. Oh boy!
  • Arrokoth is an excellent name for a Kuiper belt object. Sounds a lot like Yuggoth!
  • She’s got tofu the size of Texas
  • I just used trig functions for the first time in decades, finding the coordinates for a work surface for ground-penetrating radar. It’s another Aska in Hagebyhöga, minus the platform…
  • No, YOU’RE actually named Banazir Galpsi!
  • Swedish publishers are required by law to give copies of their books to seven research libraries. It originated as an aid to censorship but soon turned into a way to preserve the country’s literary memory. When I took my new book to the Stockholm University library the other day, I was greeted by a young staff member who had not heard of the law. She had however heard that crazy self-published authors sometimes try to force their products on the library. Awkward confusion ensued until an older librarian showed up.

Author: Martin R

Dr. Martin Rundkvist is a Swedish archaeologist, journal editor, skeptic, atheist, lefty liberal, bookworm, boardgamer, geocacher and father of two.

8 thoughts on “February Pieces Of My Mind #2”

  1. “baton czekoladowy”
    Ladowy – “lawgiver”; “cheko” – check or promissory note; and “baton” – a form of oblong colourful whirling stick.

    So, it’s a medieval debt collector’s ceremonial pom-poms, no doubt used during especially festive mass executions.

    Hey, this liberal arts stuff is easy! Perhaps I should do another thesis…

    Liked by 1 person

  2. Oh, and “monolith” is of course a single large codebase, not split up into loadable modules or separate binaries.

    I can see how stone workers thought it would make a good term also for a large single piece of stone. But I am surprised they knew so much software development terminology.

    Liked by 1 person

  3. I noticed, over the weekend, that the current RPG campaign I’m playing in is getting close to officially being a teen (first play session was on October 13, 2007). I think I will bring cake on the closest-to-anniversary session this year, as I did for when the campaign turned ten.

    Liked by 1 person

      1. We’re running a heavily tweaked GURPS Weird War II campaign. The basic premise is that the characters are all gifted with some sort of power (magic, spirit empathy, elementals as friends, what-have-you) and working for a newly formed office (MI 5 B) under Cpt. Maxwell Knight.

        The campaign started at (in-game time) October 13th, 1939 and is now up to February 2nd, 1945, with the general magic level in the world having risen twice and at least two, maybe as many as five, alternate pasts having been found.

        Right at the moment, we’ve just returned to Great Britain from the front lines, due to an urgent need to talk to a dragon in Snowdonia. We are still not sure if it was the right, or the wrong, thing to do, but we were under direct royal command to do so.

        Liked by 1 person

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