September Pieces Of My Mind #3

September work-from-home lunch with home-grown tomatoes, Bellman and roses.
  • A central plot point in Mike Carey’s latest novel hinges on near-future appliances having extremely discreet power switches. This allows people who know what the switches look like to claim supernatural powers.
  • I went in, surveyed the fridge landscape, and had four leftover jars for a light dinner. Victory.
  • In the first 16 years after I got my PhD, seven journals asked me to peer-review manuscripts for them. In the past nine months after I got a steady job with Uni Łódź, four additional journals have made use of me.
  • Writing several pieces in parallel about quite different things and feeling like dammit, I really rule actually.
  • Found out that my nearest tea plantation is probably in Turkey. There’s one on the Azores as well, on Portuguese territory, but it’s not as near Stockholm.
  • Odd thing about learning Polish from Duolingo: I recognise lots of words where I’ve forgotten what they mean. That doesn’t happen when you learn by pointing at stuff and looking quizzically at a native speaker.
  • The hard core of my boardgaming group turned out to play investigative role-playing games effortlessly too. They solved and survived the intro case in Ashen Stars in two game nights, and fun was had!
  • Pruned down and replanted the poorly New Dawn rose. Hope for stronger blooms in May!
  • Trados: mild-mannered translator and insane supervillain bent on global domination!
  • Swedish Uighurs (that’s “weedjers” to you Americans) drive Mercedeses.
  • The interesting aspect of stone axes is their original context of make, use and deposition. The interesting aspect of the Middle Ages is not people’s attitudes to ancient stone axes. Let’s all forget about the past in the past.
  • Apparently you need an unheated solarium, Sw. glasveranda, to get cacti to bloom in Scandinavia.
  • Submitted this year’s fourth journal paper. They’re all about different periods. And I haven’t even started work on any papers about this summer’s excavations yet.
  • If you’re going to write spinoffs from the Iliad, Ulysses and Aeneas seem like pretty random characters to place centre-stage.
  • Who wants recorded lectures? I’d want to read the script instead.

Author: Martin R

Dr. Martin Rundkvist is a Swedish archaeologist, journal editor, skeptic, atheist, lefty liberal, bookworm, boardgamer, geocacher and father of two.

5 thoughts on “September Pieces Of My Mind #3”

  1. “The interesting aspect of stone axes is their original context of make, use and deposition. The interesting aspect of the Middle Ages is not people’s attitudes to ancient stone axes. Let’s all forget about the past in the past.”

    What was the motivation for that?

    LinkedIn mentions some work in Sweden; what’s up with that?

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    1. Because of the post-modernist movement of the past 40 years in archaeology, many of my colleagues are obsessed by the past in the past. This is because the typical post-modernist perspective is not to study frogs, but to study people looking at frogs. Thus they like to study Medieval perspectives on Stone Age remains.

      I have a 3-month contract with the Örebro County Museum to head some fieldwork and write some popular outreach. For several days I’ve been amassing a database of radiocarbon dates from blast furnaces in certain Medieval mining districts!

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      1. I agree on postmodernism. However, the future in the past is more interesting. Fred Pohl (who blogged until he was almost 94) entitled his autobiography The Way the Future Was.

        Liked by 1 person

      2. It makes a little bit more sense in literary / historical studies, because we can know more about Roman rhetoric on Hannibal than about the man himself. But if you want to learn about the Beaker People, we can say more about site reports than what medieval and early modern people thought about henges and copper axes.

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  2. Site reports often contains information about what Medieval people thought about henges and copper axes. Because they were there and fiddled around. But I don’t share the common academic perception that this is of prime importance to our study of the Middle Ages.

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